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Medication Information includes common topics encountered by college students related to medication use. Content covers prescription drug abuse, food and beverage interactions, nonprescription medications and drug safety.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are used by 81 percent of adults in the U.S. as a first response to minor ailments.

Currently, 35 percent of adult Americans use OTC medications on a regular basis.

Currently, 35 percent of adult Americans use OTC medications on a regular basis.

Over-the-counter medications may delay seeking medical advice from your physician. Like all medications, there are risks for adverse events, interactions with your other medications and supplements, and potential for dependence, misuse, and abuse.

Choose a medicine that treats only the problems that you have. Unnecessary medicine will not help you and could actually harm you by giving you unwanted side effects.

The availability of OTC medicines provides symptomatic relief for an estimated 60 million people who otherwise would not seek treatment.

For more information about OTC medication usage

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications are NOT harmless.

Too much Tylenol® at one time can cause liver damage, especially if taken with alcohol. Check the Drug Facts label under "Active Ingredients" to see how much Tylenol® content is present, especially if taking multiple medications and combination medicines.

Too much Tylenol® at one time can cause liver damage, especially if taken with alcohol. Check the Drug Facts label under "Active Ingredients" to see how much Tylenol® content is present, especially if taking multiple medications and combination medicines.

Tylenol® comes in many forms (drops, syrups, capsules, tablets) and is contained in many combination medicines that treat cold and flu, allergy, and sleeplessness. If taken in excessive quantities it can cause liver damage. Drinking alcohol increases the risk of liver damage.

Taking acetaminophen safely. FDA YouTube video. February 2013.

Medicines In My Home: The Over-the-Counter Drug Facts Label. FDA YouTube video. September 2011.

Follow instructions on the package when you take over-the-counter medications.

Understand the risks and benefits of taking OTC medications; read the bottle labels, and take OTC medications only as directed.

If taken in large doses (more than what is on the package instructions), over-the-counter medications can be dangerous. Some OTC medications can produce dangerous health effects when taken with alcohol.

DXM (dextromethorphan), the active cough suppressant found in cough and cold medications is often abused. Abuse can cause numbness, nausea, and vomiting; and increase heart rate and blood pressure.

For more information about prescription and OTC medication abuse in teens and young adults

Herbal supplements can interact dangerously with medicines.

If taking birth control pills with St. Johns Wort, use an additional form of birth control such as a condom to avoid unexpected pregnancy.

If taking birth control pills with St. Johns Wort, use an additional form of birth control such as a condom to avoid unexpected pregnancy.

St. Johns Wort, an herbal medication used to treat depression, may decrease the effectiveness of birth control, increasing the chance of unexpected pregnancy.

Before you start using a new medication or supplement, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. They can help you use the medicine correctly and avoid medicines (and supplements) that don't mix well with each other.

Taking St. Johns Wort and dextromethorphan together can cause too much serotonin in the brain leading to heart problems and anxiety.

Both St. Johns Wort, an herbal medication used to treat depression, and dextromethorphan, a common cough suppressant, can increase serotonin levels in the brain.

For more information about herbal supplements and possible interactions with medications

QUESTION 1

Certain cough syrups contain up to ten % alcohol content and may warrant extra caution when taken with other medicines.



QUESTION 2

Taking someone else's prescription pain medication is ok, especially if I use a similar medication anyway.



QUESTION 3

All medications work best when taken with food.



QUESTION 4

Which of the following is a great question to ask your pharmacist for more specific information on your medication(s)?






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